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fakedean:

I don’t know anything about Night Vale but this is beautiful

fakedean:

I don’t know anything about Night Vale but this is beautiful

(Source: sickassbonedragon, via save-the-dance)

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meister-de-cachinnation:

bravedisneyfanatic:

Artwork by Hubidehubbe


"I have just the friend for you."

(via disneyfemslashcomics)

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fatbodypolitics:

professorfangirl:

lupusdraconis:

usagimaree:

gobeautiful:

thelatestkate:

my therapist taught me to start thinking of my anxiety as my panicky friend
it’s working???

this is so cute omg

Woah this is super useful!!

For all my anxious friends out there.

This totally works! Some of us get stuck in the sense that we *are* our emotions, so they overwhelm us and we can’t do anything about them. When you give your emotion an identity separate from you, it gives you the distance to make better judgments about it, and to comfort yourself better. 10/10 therapy veterans would recommend.

Needed this today.

fatbodypolitics:

professorfangirl:

lupusdraconis:

usagimaree:

gobeautiful:

thelatestkate:

my therapist taught me to start thinking of my anxiety as my panicky friend

it’s working???

this is so cute omg

Woah this is super useful!!

For all my anxious friends out there.

This totally works! Some of us get stuck in the sense that we *are* our emotions, so they overwhelm us and we can’t do anything about them. When you give your emotion an identity separate from you, it gives you the distance to make better judgments about it, and to comfort yourself better. 10/10 therapy veterans would recommend.

Needed this today.

(via fuckyeahwomenprotesting)

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Just demon things

samhaineveningpost:

Just demon things: Misspelling your name on legal forms so no one can control you.

(via evilsupplyco)

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asstrelli:

The Lion King
          Scar + Text Posts

(via books-and-badassery)

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bongprince:

constantly thinking “wow, i’ve really internalized some toxic shit”

(via misandry-mermaid)

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Anonymous said: Let me get this straight, Nicki Minaj can wiggle her butt six ways till Sunday and people can call her a black feminist messiah, but when there's a weak-ass Spider-Woman variant cover that make her look like she's posing like Nicki Minaj, it suddenly NOT okay and Marvel should be ashamed??? I'm honestly, seriously confused here :/

missfirestarter:

teacupnosaucer:

ohmygil:

Nicki Minaj is also a real person who makes real decisions for herself and made a video and song that celebrated her own body and her own sexuality while outright critiquing the Male Gaze through visual metaphor

Jessica Drew is not a real person and was drawn by a man in a submissive position who visually objectifies her (spandex doesn’t work on asses like that come on) and every female superhero he’s drawn. And he can’t even draw a background right.

repeat it with me now everybody: made up women drawn for gross men to jerk off to are NOT equivalent to real life women expressing their sexuality for their own benefit

BLESS THIS POST

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knitmeapony:

I love my skin!

Oh my god SO IMPORTANT SO SO SO IMPORTANT

(Source: arthaemisia, via fuckyeahwomenprotesting)

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dynamicafrica:

Today, September 8th, is the 60th birthday of Ruby Nell Bridges - a woman who, being the first black child to attend an all-white school in New Orleans in 1960, underwent a traumatizing ordeal that came to signify the deeply troubled state of race relations in America.

On her first day of school at William Frantz Elementary School, during a 1997 NewsHour interview Bridges recalled that she was perplexed by the site that befell, thinking that it was some sort of Mardi Gras celebration:

"Driving up I could see the crowd, but living in New Orleans, I actually thought it was Mardi Gras. There was a large crowd of people outside of the school. They were throwing things and shouting, and that sort of goes on in New Orleans at Mardi Gras.”

Only six-years-old at the time, little Ruby had to deal with a slew of disgusting and violent harassment, beginning with threats of violence that prompted then President Eisenhower to dispatch U.S Marshals as her official escorts, to teachers refusing to teach her and a woman who put a black baby doll in a coffin and demonstrated outside the school in protest of Ruby’s presence there. This particular ordeal had a profound effect on young Ruby who said that it “scared me more than the nasty things people screamed at us.”

Only one teacher, Barbara Henry, would teach Ruby and did so for over a year with Ruby being the only pupil in her class.

The Bridges family suffered greatly for their brave decision. Her father lost his job, they were barred from shopping at their local grocery store, her grandparents, who were sharecroppers, were forcibly removed from their land, not to mention the psychological effect this entire ordeal had on her family. There were, however, members of their community - both black and white - who gathered behind the Bridges family in a show of support, including providing her father with a new job and taking turns to babysit Ruby.

Part of her experience was immortalized in a 1964 Norman Rockwell painting, pictured above, titled The Problem We All Live With. Her entire story was made into a TV movie released in 1998.

Despite the end of the segregation of schools in the United States, studies and reports show that the situation is worse now than it was in the 1960s.

Today, still living in New Orleans, Briges works as an activist, who has spoken at TEDx, and is now chair of the Ruby Bridges Foundation.

(via vulgarweed)